The Limelight Generation

When times are tight, the good have to be better whatever line of business they happen to be in. Consumers vote with their feet and employers have a veritable buffet of talent to pick from. So why is it, when I interview people these days, regardless of age or experience, talk tends towards what they’d like to get out of the job, and where they see themselves going… rather than how we are going to benefit from them joining us? And to top it all, I’ve even had situations where chat has been capped with the declaration that their dream job actually lies elsewhere but they really want the experience. Great, otherwise translated as…. So this’ll be a convenient cul-de-sac for me to plunder in the interim. I don’t think so.

I’m not being naive. Of course everyone should have goals, and we all need a sense of what we’re achieving and where we’re going, but surely it’s about taking that journey one step at a time? Instead, I feel we’re caught in the midst of the “Limelight Generation”: a time when too many fail to join the dots between effort, respect and subsequent gain. What’s happened to the wish to contribute? What happened to pride; or the satisfaction of accomplishment?

Where you are, is where you’re at right now. Add a little commitment and dedication and that place might just be enjoyable. After all, it’s ideas, integrity and originality that are the true currency of success today, not availability or the desire for promotion.

Impatience has replaced curiosity when it comes to apprenticeship; learning a skill is deemed too slow. Nowadays it’s corner-office straight away please and a company-paid trip to Paris the week after if you don’t mind, because I’m worth it. In fact, I think it’s exactly the same mentality that leads people to seek benefits rather than a job on the basis that the “pay” is the same — the expectation of something for nothing. What’s really sad is that this subtraction-mentality perpetuates only disillusion. After all, if your eye is always on the prize just out of reach, you’ll miss the potential right in front of you. In other words, sort the motivation, and a whole new world of possibility might just appear.