MO x Arteriors

My Arteriors story starts when the brand first opened its showroom in London’s Chelsea Harbour Design Centre in September 2017. Visiting in my capacity as a magazine editor, I was swiftly cornered by an enthusiastic PR keen to know my thoughts. Never one to hold back my forthright opinions, I said that I found the showroom a little too full, bright and busily styled for my tastes. Cue crest fallen expression. However, a few months later I was invited to walk my talk and be the first UK participant in the brands’ highly successful ‘Designer Interpretations’ series, a handing over of the styling reins to an external creative with the aim of “opening up the brand to a different point of view” in the words of Arteriors’ Head of Marketing and Visual, Krista Stelling. A brave and confident challenge that I was absolutely honoured to accept. Herewith the results of that collaboration…

Invite to the launch of Arteriors x Michelle Ogundehin, September 2018

My moodboard of my Arteriors x Michelle Ogundehin 'Designer Interpretations" at the brand's London showroom in Chelsea Harbour Design Centre, September 2018

My moodboard of my Arteriors x Michelle Ogundehin ‘Designer Interpretations” at the brand’s London showroom in Chelsea Harbour Design Centre, September 2018

My edit of a selection of pieces from the Arteriors Home collection

My edit of a selection of pieces from the Arteriors Home collection. Wall behind painted in ‘Marine Blue’ from The Little Greene Paint Company.

But who is Arteriors?

Founded in 1987 by Mark Moussa, Arteriors, headquartered in Dallas, started out as a small accessories company. Gradually Mark, who previously worked alongside his father in the family import business, added a few lights, then a couple of pieces of accent furniture, until we fast forward to today, and it’s a huge global enterprise releasing more than 500 new designs every year. Mark describes his strategy as thinking like a fashion brand because as he introduces new pieces he also retires others enabling the stock to constantly evolve. As for his inspirations, he describes it thus: “I look to create products with a visual push and pull by combining finishes, forms and fabrics in a way that is provocative and compelling yet still allows for personal interpretation. I love the yin and yang of artisan and luxe and embrace the notion that many of our pieces are art pieces, so to speak.”

And this is precisely what drew me to working with the brand: the mix of raw and refined combined with the clear influence of art, fashion and travel with a healthy dose of artisanal luxe to all the pieces. As Mark puts it, “The human element in Arteriors’ products is something I value — it’s the signature that the artist puts on each of the products they produce. That human touch and artisanal element is what makes each piece special and one-of-a-kind.” It was a marvellous palette to play with, and a great team to collaborate with. I heartily, and authentically endorse its wares!

PS It also has a practice in the US (not common in the UK) of selling key upholstery items with a simple muslin covering so you can send them to be dressed in any fabric of your choosing by your own upholsterer (see example here). Genius. In the UK you can follow the usual COM (‘Customer’s Own Material’) protocol and they’ll do it for you in 6-8 weeks with the prices shown including the upholstering costs! Good to know, non.

Interview with Arteriors Home

  • What’s the inspiration behind your curated space?

I felt that many of the pieces were incredibly sculptural, as well as rich in form and texture, which made me think of Brancusi, especially his Parisian studio, which is still open to the public, and shows many of his works stacked one on top of the other.

Arteriors’ designs are also made from an extremely refined palette of materials — marble, wood, antiqued bronze, brass, polished nickel and iron — so this made me think too of the French architect/interior designer Joseph Dirand, whose work I really admire.

I effectively combined these two references in my head, threw in my love of off-beat symmetry, a preference for multiples (it’s a Feng Shui thing, I believe pairs of pieces make for a happier space!), and then overlaid that with plenty of rich pattern and texture.

The Parisian atelier of the sculptor Brancusi.

The Parisian atelier of the sculptor Brancusi.

A Parisian café designed by Joseph Dirand

The ‘Monsieur Bleu’ café in Paris designed by Joseph Dirand

Essentially, I worked up from the floor and furniture to create a solid base for the look, centering my concept around the generous curves of the ‘Turner’ sofa (which I re-upholstered in a sumptuous ‘Adamo & Eva’ 100% cotton velvet from Dedar), and then I took a lead from the fabulous ‘Jericho’ reclining chairs (which definitely have ‘Future Classic’ written all over them!) which are finished in teak with hand-woven jute seats and really epitomise the move I predicted on one of my Trendbulletins towards more humble materials being handled exquisitely in the home.

I see this sort of project as dressing a space in a series of layers. The final touch? I added jewellery to the look in the form of some of the amazing lighting and accessories which Arteriors really excels at.

The top of the antique brass covered ‘Daryl’ table. Shown with the ‘McCoy’ three-part brass sculpture.

First visual notes on how various pieces might work together

Computer aided cut and paste mock ups for my installation. Olde School!

  • How does the space reflect your personal style?

The colours, mix of materials and touch-tastic textures are all very me. Plus, I absolutely love to add a little unexpected top note to any scheme, in this case a dash of Chinoiserie via the amazing ‘Lodi Garden’ print from Brunschwig & Fils which I had made up into a pencil pleated curtain to drape across the back wall. And then the mix of fabrics I chose for the cushions (‘Say Goodbye Flora’ from Dedar; ‘Xian’ from Brunschwig & Fils; ‘Acid Palm’ and ‘Polka Dot Plush‘ in a wonderful mustard colour, both from Kravet) was all about adding contrast and spice. Softening the space, and mixing all of these elements together to create something warm and inviting.

Moodboard of materials and colours: 'Lodi Garden' in grey and 'Xian' in Seafoam from Brunschwig et Fils; 'Acid Palm' in surf by Jonathan Adler for Kravet; 'Polka Dot Plush' in quince also by Kravet; 'Say Goodbye Flora' by Dedar, as is the Cedre coloured velvet. Paints: 'Marine Blue' and 'Light Peach Blossom' both from The Little Greene Paint company.

Moodboard of materials and colours: ‘Lodi Garden’ in grey and ‘Xian’ in Seafoam from Brunschwig et Fils; ‘Acid Palm’ in surf by Jonathan Adler for Kravet; ‘Polka Dot Plush’ in quince also by Kravet; ‘Say Goodbye Flora’ by Dedar, as is the Cedre coloured velvet. Paints: ‘Marine Blue’ and ‘Light Peach Blossom’ both from The Little Greene Paint company.

Brunschwig et Fils 'Lodi Garden' fabric in grey. A fantastically narrative print on a Chinoiserie theme. Shown here alongside 'Marine Blue' by The Little Greene Paint Company

Brunschwig et Fils ‘Lodi Garden’ fabric in grey. A fantastically narrative print on a Chinoiserie theme. Shown here alongside ‘Marine Blue’ by The Little Greene Paint Company

Mock up for the main 'Turner' sofa set-up. The aim was for a sense of off-beat symmetry focused around this grand swoop of a sofa.

Mock up for the main ‘Turner’ sofa set-up. The aim was for a sense of off-beat symmetry focused around this grand swoop of a sofa, with chandelier hung on either side like a pair of fabulous drop earrings.

The 'Adamo & Eva' 100% cotton velvet from Dedar in the crisp green 150 colour way called 'Cedro'. (Martindale 50,000, 140cm wide)..

Used to upholster the sofa, the ‘Adamo & Eva’ 100% cotton velvet from Dedar in the crisp green 150 colour way called ‘Cedro’. (Martindale 50,000, 140cm wide).

Jonathan Adler’s ‘Acid Palm’ fabric in surf, and the ‘Polka Dot Plush’ in quince, both from Kravet, made into cushions by Adrian Robins Design,; and shown on the the ‘Jericho’ chair with it’s hand-woven jute seat..

  • Can you talk us through the design process for the space and how consumers can translate this to their homes?

I work in a way that I consider to be inspirational yet achievable for a consumer, just as I did when I was editing ELLE Decoration. I’ve deliberately picked pieces that I felt could be ‘Future Classics’, timeless furniture and lighting you could live with for a lifetime. And then I’ve accessorized them very simply with texture underfoot in the form of the fabulous ‘Volos’ carpet from Tufenkian Carpets, underpinned with sisal matting from Tim Page Carpets, and then laid a nice big dollop of pattern on top of it all via a clutch of deliberately differently-sized cushions.

And then it’s all set up to create the sense of a liveable space that could easily be translated into a home: a central focal point, framed by lighting and faced by two additional ‘moments’ that are designed to create a sense of dialogue and flow across the room, physically linked by the rugs underfoot.

In short, I wanted to create a space within the showroom that customers could really relate to, come in, sit down in, and start to imagineer new interiors ideas for themselves. I think this is what needs to be at the heart of retail today, a sense of escapism made easy. Showing people what’s possible through design. But you need to hold people by the hand. It’s a fatal assumption to think everyone sees the world the way you do, and can automatically pair chairs and cushions, pots and platters. They can’t. But show them the way and I believe they will buy.

My moodboard of my Arteriors x Michelle Ogundehin 'Designer Interpretations" at the brand's London showroom in Chelsea Harbour Design Centre, September 2018

My moodboard of my Arteriors x Michelle Ogundehin ‘Designer Interpretations” at the brand’s London showroom in Chelsea Harbour Design Centre, September 2018

Portrait on set at Arteriors' London showroom.

Portrait on set at Arteriors’ London showroom.

My seven favourite pieces from the Arteriors Home collection…

  1. The ‘Jericho’ reclining armchair in wood with hand-woven jute seats. £3,754 Arteriors Home

    The 'Jericho' adjustable armchair in wood with hand-woven jute seats. £3,754, Arteriors Home.

    The ‘Jericho’ adjustable armchair in wood with hand-woven jute seats. £3,754, Arteriors Home.

  2.  The ‘Luxembourg’ mirror crafted from distressed mirror pieces. Can be hung vertically or horizontally. I used two of these, hung horizontally in my installation. (Approximately 113cm by 71cm) £1,234. Arteriors Home.

    The 'Luxembourg' mirror crafted from distressed mirror pieces. Can be hung vertically or horizontally. £1,505. Arteriors Home.

    The ‘Luxembourg’ mirror crafted from distressed mirror pieces. Can be hung vertically or horizontally. (Approximately 113cm by 71cm) £1,234. Arteriors Home.

  3. The ‘Jonas’ chandelier with antique brass cylinders and bronze outer bands.£1,743 Arteriors Home

    The 'Jonas' chandelier with antique brass cylinders and bronze outer bands.

    The ‘Jonas’ chandelier with antique brass cylinders and bronze outer bands. £1,743 Arteriors Home.

  4. The ‘Daryl’ side table has a wooden top that’s been clad in antique brass sheet that shows off the wood grain. £1,475 Arteriors Home

    The 'Daryl' side table has a wooden top that's been clad in an Antique brass sheet so as to show off the wood grain. Arteriors Home

    The ‘Daryl’ side table has a wooden top that’s been clad in an Antique brass sheet so as to show off the wood grain. £1,475 Arteriors Home

  5. The ‘McCoy’ sculptures come as a set of three antique brass cubes that can be re-arranged at will. £188 Arteriors Home

    The 'McCoy Sculptures' come as a set of three antique brass cubes that can be re-arranged at will. £149.58 Arteriors Home

    The ‘McCoy Sculptures’ come as a set of three antique brass cubes that can be re-arranged at will. £188 Arteriors Home

  6. The ‘Violetta’ table lamp. A modern classic. So simple yet so striking. Also comes as a floor lamp.£885  Arteriors Home.

    The ‘Violetta’ table lamp. A modern classic. So simple yet so striking. Also comes as a floor lamp. £885 Arteriors Home.

  7.  The ‘Nolan’ pendant lamp sits beautifully with the ‘Jonas’ chandelier, sharing the same language of antiqued brass cylinder and bronze outer ring. Except this one has a diameter of 76cm! (There’s a smaller version though, dia approx 55cm, plus even  a version with a glossy white cylinder). £1,260 Arteriors Home

    The ‘Nolan’ pendant sits beautifully with the ‘Jonas’ chandelier, sharing the same language of antiques brass cylinder and bronze outer ring. Except this one has a diameter of 76cm! There is a smaller version too, diameter approx 55cm. Plus a version with a glossy white cylinder. £1,260 Arteriors Home

Credit where credit is due…

Although I’m pretty sure I’ve mentioned all my non Arteriors partners-in-design above in the copy and captions, I thought it would be handy to group them all together here, nice and clearly. And to note that they’re all available via their showrooms at the Chelsea Harbour Design Centre, a veritable one-stop department store for design!

Fabrics

‘Say Goodbye Flora’ from Dedar (On the Ground Floor in the East wing of the Harbour)

‘Adamo & Eva’ in colour 150: Cedro, a 100% cotton velvet used to upholster the sofa, also from Dedar

‘Polka Dot Plush‘ in quince, a fabulous mustardy colour, from Kravet (Ground floor alongside GB&J Baker in the East wing of  the Harbour)

‘Acid Palm’ in surf, designed by Jonathan Adler for Kravet (as above)

‘Lodi Garden’ in grey (100% cotton), and ‘Xian’ a linen and cotton print in Seafoam/Sand, both wonderfully narrative Chinoiserie-inspired print by Brunschwig & Fils (Also Ground floor shown alongside GB&J Baker in the East wing of  the Harbour)

Flooring

‘Volos rug from Tufenkian in its Winter Lake colourway. (Third Floor in the Centre Dome of the Harbour)

‘TPC Sisal’ 100% sisal matting, in colour 5,  from Tim Page Carpets (Ground floor in the Centre Dome of the Harbour)

Paints

‘Marine Blue’ a deep teal blue from The Little Greene Paint Company

‘Light Peach Blossom’ a warm peachy pink from The Little Greene Paint Company

Upholstery

Cushions and curtains expertly made by Adrian Robins Design

Ends